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Finding the Right FIT – Knight Cancer Institute Grant Funded Project

Colon cancer is preventable and beatable when caught early. Colon cancer screening in the Gorge for Medicaid clients is below the Oregon state average and below commercially insured clients.

A new at-home test called Fecal Immunochemical Tests or FIT kits lets users take poop samples for testing to detect colon cancer. 

This project is to identify which FIT kits are the most usable for community members and providers.

Objective:

This project will allow us to achieve the following objectives:

  • Use clinician and community member input to identify and recommend one or a few FIT kits and processing methods for implementation across primary care clinics in the region
  • Perform an inventory of current primary care clinic workflows, resources and barriers to initiating and completing the screening process
  • Create and execute a series of educational events with primary care and colonoscopy providers in the community to share and receive feedback on medical evidence and recommendations around colon cancer screening as well as implementation information about FIT kits and processing options. We believe this will mostly improve clinician knowledge about the effectiveness of FIT testing when implemented using a high sensitivity test and systematic follow up processes.
  • Increase basic community awareness of colon cancer screening through press releases about this project to radio and print outlets in the region

The overall result of this project will be an increase in colorectal cancer screening in our region, especially for populations that are currently underscreened. The outcomes of this particular Tier II grant project over the next 12 months will be:

  • One or a small number of FIT kits and processing methods for will be endorsed by the CAP and CAC for implementation across primary care clinics in the region
  • A completed inventory of current primary care clinic workflows, resources and barriers related to colon cancer screening
  • Primary care clinicians and local colonoscopy providers will have a shared and accurate knowledge of medical evidence and recommendations around colon cancer screening as well as implementation information about FIT kits and processing options
  • An assessment, based on Oregon Health Plan claims data, of the change in screening rates or trends associated with these interventions across 2-3 primary care clinics in the region.

In the long run, we expect that this community-wide effort to create and align core health system resources will lay the groundwork for a pragmatic research trial of a multi-faceted, systematic approach to improve rates of colon cancer screening across our community.